Urology Annals

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 336--339

Bilateral same session renal stone surgery tolerance and complications


Abdulmalik Addar1, Ahmed Aljuhayman2, Yahya Ghazwani3, Abdullah Al Khayal3, Ahmed Alasker3, Esteban Emiliani4, Saeed Bin Hamri5 
1 Department of Urology, McGill University Health Center, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
2 Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al-Majmaah, Saudi Arabia
3 Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Ministry of the National Guard - Health Affairs; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center; College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 PETRA-UROGROUP, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Endourology and Urolithiasis Unit, Fundacio Puigvert, Barcelona, Spain
5 Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Ministry of the National Guard - Health Affairs; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center; College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences; PETRA-UROGROUP, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saeed Bin Hamri
2682 Prince Muteb Bin Abdulah Street, Ar Rimayah, Riyadh 14611
Saudi Arabia

Introduction: The prevalence rate of upper urinary tract calculi in Saudi Arabia is one of the highest globally. Bilateral renal stone management is an option but is still controversial. Methodology: The study was a retrospective study, including 31 patients with bilateral renal or ureteric stones who underwent bilateral same-session ureterorenoscopy (BSS-URS). The data collected included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), stone burden bilaterally, operative time bilaterally, hospital stay, stone location, type of anesthesia, stone history, renal anomaly as well as pre- and postoperative JJ stenting. In addition, data related to complications (ureteric injury, renal failure, urinary tract infection, pain requiring an emergency department visit within 1 week of the procedure), the stone-free rate (defined as £ 3 mm asymptomatic stone fragment identified with computed tomography Kidney, Ureter and Bladder 3 months after surgery was also collected. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system, entered in an Excel spreadsheet, and descriptive analysis was done. Results: In total, 31 patients were included, with the majority (80.6%, n = 25) male. The mean age was 41.6 years, the mean BMI 28.7 ± 5.59, the mean operative time for each renal unit 46.53 ± 25.69 min, and the mean hospital stay 17.87 ± 8.43 h. The majority (96.7%, n = 30) received general anesthesia. Less than half (40.3%, n = 25) of the renal units had stones in multiple calyces and the majority (90.3%, n = 56) of the renal units were stone free at the 3-month follow-up. A small proportion (3.2%, n = 2) of the renal units were polycystic. Prestenting was documented in 40.3% (n = 25) of the renal units and the majority (95.2%, n = 59) were stented postoperatively. Conclusion: BSS-URS is a safe and a highly effective management option for bilateral renal stones.


How to cite this article:
Addar A, Aljuhayman A, Ghazwani Y, Al Khayal A, Alasker A, Emiliani E, Hamri SB. Bilateral same session renal stone surgery tolerance and complications.Urol Ann 2021;13:336-339


How to cite this URL:
Addar A, Aljuhayman A, Ghazwani Y, Al Khayal A, Alasker A, Emiliani E, Hamri SB. Bilateral same session renal stone surgery tolerance and complications. Urol Ann [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 8 ];13:336-339
Available from: https://www.urologyannals.com/article.asp?issn=0974-7796;year=2021;volume=13;issue=4;spage=336;epage=339;aulast=Addar;type=0